Open Windows and Closed Doors

We’ve been in our new home for a full month now, and I have to say, living in a home that’s about 150 years old has some...quirks. This is probably an even more drastic adjustment when the house we lived in prior was literally brand new.

Let me give you an example.

One morning last week, I woke up in the morning and started getting ready for work. When I went to leave the bathroom after brushing my teeth, I couldn’t get the door open. The knob would not turn in the slightest. Nothing. Mr Big started to meow and scratch at the door, clearly sensing my distress. I fussed with the door for about 2-3 minutes before I started to get worried. I was literally stuck in my own bathroom. I started yelling for Geoff, who was still asleep, but I wasn’t getting any reaction. Thankfully, I realized I had my phone and was able to get his attention that way.

So he got up and walked over to the bathroom door (laughing at my situation, of course). His laughing subsided a bit when it wouldn’t open from his side either. After attempting to get the knob to turn for a minute, he said “Hang on, I’ll be right back.” (As if I had a choice.) He went off for a no more than a minute and then says through the door, “Uhhh, we have another problem.”  “Great...what?”, I said. “L.C. is on the roof.” (L.C. is our other cat) WHAT?  How is this real life?

We decided to proceed with getting me out of the bathroom before we moved on to the “cat on the roof” situation. Now equipped with a screwdriver, Geoff attempted to take off the doorknob. He was successful, but only in the sense that now he had no knob to even attempt to turn. Turns out that the mechanism that actually was holding the door closed had snapped in half at some point in its lifetime, so there was no hope of the knob ever doing its job. There was no way for him to get me a screwdriver or anything through cracks around the door. The house is made to keep heat in the rooms, so everything is a tight fit which was really not ideal in the situation at hand. I looked around the bathroom for anything I could use as a screwdriver stand-in, but no luck. And the door still wouldn’t budge.

Apparently those little bits to the right are "key" when it comes to opening the door.

Apparently those little bits to the right are "key" when it comes to opening the door.

Finally, after much tapping and wedging the internal door parts from Geoff’s side of the door, it opened! I was freed! Escaping was really much less anti-climactic than I was expecting after my perilous imprisonment of about 12 minutes, but at least I could get to my pants.

The results of my escape.

The results of my escape.

Next up, LC on the roof. Seriously. This is not really related to the age of the house, but it’s just too crazy, so I wanted to share.

Houses in Ireland don’t typically have air conditioning, and ours is no exception. In the few days that are warm enough to warrant it, the Irish get by with open windows and fans as needed. It’s grand. Anyway, for some reason, windows don’t have any screens on them, so flies can come in (annoying), and cats can go out (also annoying). Our second floor window allows access to the roof over the kitchen, and well...you can figure out what happened.

After I escaped the bathroom, we rushed over to the bedroom to have a look at our new meowing roof decoration. He was as happy as can be. Meanwhile we’re trying to figure out how to end his bird watching escapade.

Only the top half of the windows open in our house, so I had to stand on the window sill and reach out of the window to try to grab the cat. Really, it was more like I had to hang the top half of my body out of the window, Geoff holding my legs, and reach for the cat (who really didn’t want to be rescued at all).

L.C. was probably just trying to enjoy the view.

L.C. was probably just trying to enjoy the view.

After some kitty coercion, I was able to grab LC and get him into the house safely. Then I actually had to finish getting ready for work and start my day after what seemed like a full day’s worth of events already.

Obviously this is just a silly example of what happens when you live in an old home, but there are of course some really cool things about the house too: three fireplaces (I can’t wait until winter! Please remind me I said that in six months), amazing crown molding, and beautiful hardwood floors. I am excited and scared to see what else we discover living in this home and making it our own. Stay tuned!